Difference between revisions of "1981-11-14 Aaron Pryor w rsc 7 (15) Dujuan Johnson, Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio, USA - WBA"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
1981-11-14 [[Aaron Pryor]] w rsc 7 (15) [[Dujuan Johnson]], Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio, USA - WBA. Referee: Jackie Keough. No respecter of reputations after winning 17 in a row, Johnson (140) went after the champion at the opening bell and before too long had dropped him with a solid right to the head. With his pride shaken, Pryor (139¼) was soon back on his feet firing in punches from both hands, but was hurt again by a left hook before the round was over. It was a different matter thereafter as Pryor found his distance and began to put his punches together better, while Johnson fired in one at a time, and while he was shaken up on the odd occasion by the fifth he was taking over. Having hurt Johnson in the previous session, the sixth saw Pryor really going to work and in the seventh it was more of the same as he unleashed a barrage of blows to head and body, which only abated when the referee stopped the fight at 1.49 after the challenger failed to respond.   
+
1981-11-14 [[Aaron Pryor]] w rsc 7 (15) [[Dujuan Johnson]], Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio, USA - WBA. Referee: Jackie Keough. No respecter of reputations after winning 17 in a row, Johnson (140) chased down the champion at the opening bell, dropping him with a solid right to the head. With his pride shaken Pryor (139¼) was soon back on his feet firing in punches from both hands, but was hurt again by a left hook before the round was over. It was a different matter thereafter as Pryor found his distance when beginning to put his punches together better while Johnson fired in one at a time, and although he was shaken up on the odd occasion by the fifth he was taking over. Having hurt Johnson in the previous session, the sixth saw Pryor really going to work. In the seventh it was more of the same as he unleashed a barrage of blows to head and body, which only abated when the referee stopped the fight at 1.49 after the challenger failed to respond.   
  
[[Miguel Montilla]], who had already had two attempts at the title would be Pryor’s next challenger. A hardened pro, Montilla had 37 wins from 46 contests and although having had just five fights in the last two years and losing a close one to Johnson he had beaten [[Alfonso Frazer]] and [[Domingo Ayala]]. He was ranked at number four by ''The Ring'' magazine.           
+
[[Miguel Montilla]], who already had two attempts at the title would be Pryor’s next challenger. A hardened pro, Montilla had 37 wins from 46 contests, and despite having had just five fights in the last two years and losing a close one to Johnson he had beaten [[Alfonso Frazer]] and [[Domingo Ayala]]. He was ranked at number four by ''The Ring'' magazine.           
  
 
[[Category: 1981 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1981 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Junior Welterweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Junior Welterweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 13:49, 1 May 2013

1981-11-14 Aaron Pryor w rsc 7 (15) Dujuan Johnson, Public Auditorium, Cleveland, Ohio, USA - WBA. Referee: Jackie Keough. No respecter of reputations after winning 17 in a row, Johnson (140) chased down the champion at the opening bell, dropping him with a solid right to the head. With his pride shaken Pryor (139¼) was soon back on his feet firing in punches from both hands, but was hurt again by a left hook before the round was over. It was a different matter thereafter as Pryor found his distance when beginning to put his punches together better while Johnson fired in one at a time, and although he was shaken up on the odd occasion by the fifth he was taking over. Having hurt Johnson in the previous session, the sixth saw Pryor really going to work. In the seventh it was more of the same as he unleashed a barrage of blows to head and body, which only abated when the referee stopped the fight at 1.49 after the challenger failed to respond.

Miguel Montilla, who already had two attempts at the title would be Pryor’s next challenger. A hardened pro, Montilla had 37 wins from 46 contests, and despite having had just five fights in the last two years and losing a close one to Johnson he had beaten Alfonso Frazer and Domingo Ayala. He was ranked at number four by The Ring magazine.