Difference between revisions of "1987-06-14 Kyung-Yung Lee w rsc 2 (15) Masaharu Kawakami, Hawaiian Hotel, Bukok, South Korea - IBF"

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1987-06-14 Kyung-Yung Lee w rsc 2 (15) Masaharu Kawakami, Hawaiian Hotel, Bukok, South Korea - IBF. Referee: Tom Evaristo. Lee (105) became the first IBF mini-flyweight champion when he easily stopped Kawakami (104¾) after 31 seconds of the second round had elapsed, the referee rescuing the outgunned Jap to save him from further punishment. With Kawakami being a mere six to eight-round fighter and not even licensed by the Japanese Boxing Commission, it was a mismatch and gave no credit to all concerned. Lee relinquished the IBF version of the title in December in order to challenge for the more prestigious WBC crown.
 
1987-06-14 Kyung-Yung Lee w rsc 2 (15) Masaharu Kawakami, Hawaiian Hotel, Bukok, South Korea - IBF. Referee: Tom Evaristo. Lee (105) became the first IBF mini-flyweight champion when he easily stopped Kawakami (104¾) after 31 seconds of the second round had elapsed, the referee rescuing the outgunned Jap to save him from further punishment. With Kawakami being a mere six to eight-round fighter and not even licensed by the Japanese Boxing Commission, it was a mismatch and gave no credit to all concerned. Lee relinquished the IBF version of the title in December in order to challenge for the more prestigious WBC crown.
  
[[Category: 1987 Contests]]
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[[Category: 1987 Mini Flyweight Contests]]
 
[[Category: Mini Flyweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Mini Flyweight Division]]

Revision as of 16:17, 23 November 2011

1987-06-14 Kyung-Yung Lee w rsc 2 (15) Masaharu Kawakami, Hawaiian Hotel, Bukok, South Korea - IBF. Referee: Tom Evaristo. Lee (105) became the first IBF mini-flyweight champion when he easily stopped Kawakami (104¾) after 31 seconds of the second round had elapsed, the referee rescuing the outgunned Jap to save him from further punishment. With Kawakami being a mere six to eight-round fighter and not even licensed by the Japanese Boxing Commission, it was a mismatch and gave no credit to all concerned. Lee relinquished the IBF version of the title in December in order to challenge for the more prestigious WBC crown.