Difference between revisions of "1991-09-21 Chris Eubank w rsc 12 Michael Watson, White Hart Lane, Tottenham, London, England - WBO"

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1991-09-21 [[Chris Eubank]] w rsc 12 [[Michael Watson]], White Hart Lane, Tottenham, London, England - WBO. Referee: Roy Francis. Determined to avenge a defeat at the hands of Eubank (167) three months earlier, Watson (166) had got himself into great condition for this battle that was billed for the vacant title after Thomas Hearns had moved up a weight class. Driving on for round after round Watson walked through Eubank’s heavy counter punches to get his own off and at the end of the tenth there was little between them. In the 11th it was Eubank’s turn to mount a big attack and after surviving the assault Watson, having sensed a certain tiredness in his foe, dropped the man from Brighton with a left-right combination that was followed by a cracking right to the head. As Watson moved in for the kill after Eubank had scrambled up he walked straight into a terrific right uppercut that dropped him in a heap. Saved by the bell, in hindsight Watson should not have been allowed out for the 12th and with Eubank all over him the referee stopped the fight 29 seconds into the session. At the time of the stoppage Watson was ahead on all three cards, but moments later he had slumped into unconsciousness and was on his way to hospital to have a blood clot removed from his brain. Having survived after being given little chance at one stage, Watson would eventually and successfully sue the British Boxing Board of Control in a landmark case.  
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1991-09-21 [[Chris Eubank]] w rsc 12 [[Michael Watson]], White Hart Lane, Tottenham, London, England - WBO. Referee: Roy Francis. Determined to avenge a defeat at the hands of Eubank (167) three months earlier, Watson (166) had got himself into great condition for this battle that was billed for the vacant title after Thomas Hearns had moved up a weight class. Driving on for round after round Watson walked through Eubank’s heavy counter punches to get his own off and at the end of the tenth there was little between them. In the 11th it was Eubank’s turn to mount a big attack and after surviving the assault Watson, having sensed a certain tiredness in his foe, dropped the man from Brighton with a left-right combination that was followed by a cracking right to the head. As Watson moved in for the kill after Eubank had scrambled up he walked straight into a terrific right uppercut that dropped him in a heap. Saved by the bell, in hindsight Watson should not have been allowed out for the 12th and with Eubank all over him the referee stopped the fight 29 seconds into the session.  
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At the time of the stoppage Watson was ahead on all three cards, but moments later he had slumped into unconsciousness and was on his way to hospital to have a blood clot removed from his brain. Having survived after being given little chance at one stage, Watson would eventually and successfully sue the British Boxing Board of Control in a landmark case.  
  
 
[[Category: 1991 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1991 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Super Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Super Middleweight Division]]

Revision as of 14:46, 1 February 2012

1991-09-21 Chris Eubank w rsc 12 Michael Watson, White Hart Lane, Tottenham, London, England - WBO. Referee: Roy Francis. Determined to avenge a defeat at the hands of Eubank (167) three months earlier, Watson (166) had got himself into great condition for this battle that was billed for the vacant title after Thomas Hearns had moved up a weight class. Driving on for round after round Watson walked through Eubank’s heavy counter punches to get his own off and at the end of the tenth there was little between them. In the 11th it was Eubank’s turn to mount a big attack and after surviving the assault Watson, having sensed a certain tiredness in his foe, dropped the man from Brighton with a left-right combination that was followed by a cracking right to the head. As Watson moved in for the kill after Eubank had scrambled up he walked straight into a terrific right uppercut that dropped him in a heap. Saved by the bell, in hindsight Watson should not have been allowed out for the 12th and with Eubank all over him the referee stopped the fight 29 seconds into the session.

At the time of the stoppage Watson was ahead on all three cards, but moments later he had slumped into unconsciousness and was on his way to hospital to have a blood clot removed from his brain. Having survived after being given little chance at one stage, Watson would eventually and successfully sue the British Boxing Board of Control in a landmark case.