Difference between revisions of "1994-11-05 Jorge Castro w co 2 Alex Ramos, Municipal Gym, Caleta Olivia, Argentina - WBA"

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1994-11-05 [[Jorge Castro]] w co 2 [[Alex Ramos]], Municipal Gym, Caleta Olivia, Argentina - WBA. Referee: Referee: Enzo Montero. In one of the worst mismatches of recent times, Ramos (159¾), who was at his peak ten years earlier and was back in the ring after a cocaine addiction, was at the mercy of the champion from the opening bell. Having been worked all over and almost dropped in the first, Ramos was dropped by a single left hook to the body and counted out on the 1.31 mark. With virtually no punches coming his way, Castro (159½) had barely worked up a sweat against a man who had somehow been elevated to championship status after beating nine unknowns following a kayo defeat at the hands of [[Segundo Mercado]].     
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1994-11-05 [[Jorge Castro]] w co 2 [[Alex Ramos]], Municipal Gym, Caleta Olivia, Argentina - WBA. Referee: Referee: Enzo Montero. In one of the worst mismatches of recent times, Ramos (159¾), who was at his peak ten years earlier and was back in the ring after a cocaine addiction, was at the mercy of the champion from the opening bell. Having been worked all over, almost being floored in the first, Ramos was dropped by a single left hook to the body and counted out in the second on the 1.31 mark. With virtually no punches coming his way, Castro (159½) had barely worked up a sweat against a man who had somehow been elevated to championship status after beating nine unknowns following a kayo defeat at the hands of [[Segundo Mercado]].     
  
 
[[Category: 1994 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: 1994 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Middleweight Division]]

Latest revision as of 13:49, 23 June 2013

1994-11-05 Jorge Castro w co 2 Alex Ramos, Municipal Gym, Caleta Olivia, Argentina - WBA. Referee: Referee: Enzo Montero. In one of the worst mismatches of recent times, Ramos (159¾), who was at his peak ten years earlier and was back in the ring after a cocaine addiction, was at the mercy of the champion from the opening bell. Having been worked all over, almost being floored in the first, Ramos was dropped by a single left hook to the body and counted out in the second on the 1.31 mark. With virtually no punches coming his way, Castro (159½) had barely worked up a sweat against a man who had somehow been elevated to championship status after beating nine unknowns following a kayo defeat at the hands of Segundo Mercado.