1999-11-07 Hideki Todaka w pts 12 Akihiko Nago, Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan - WBA

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1999-11-07 [[Hideki Todaka]] w pts 12 [[Akihiko Nago]], Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan - WBA. Referee: Armando Garcia. Scorecards: 115-113, 116-113, 116-114. Dominating the fight with studied aggression, Todaka (115) was good value for his points win over the previously unbeaten, hard-hitting Nago (115), a southpaw who was expected to pose a real danger. There were no knockdowns, but Todaka’s constant pressure was too much for the challenger, who was forced to retreat for most of the time, and apart from three sessions where he had some success with overarm rights he was generally outmanoeuvred.     
 
1999-11-07 [[Hideki Todaka]] w pts 12 [[Akihiko Nago]], Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan - WBA. Referee: Armando Garcia. Scorecards: 115-113, 116-113, 116-114. Dominating the fight with studied aggression, Todaka (115) was good value for his points win over the previously unbeaten, hard-hitting Nago (115), a southpaw who was expected to pose a real danger. There were no knockdowns, but Todaka’s constant pressure was too much for the challenger, who was forced to retreat for most of the time, and apart from three sessions where he had some success with overarm rights he was generally outmanoeuvred.     
  
[[Category: 1999 Junior Bantamweight Title Contests]]
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[[Category: 1999 Title Contests]]
 
[[Category: Junior Bantamweight Division]]
 
[[Category: Junior Bantamweight Division]]

Revision as of 17:59, 14 November 2012

1999-11-07 Hideki Todaka w pts 12 Akihiko Nago, Ryogoku Sumo Arena, Tokyo, Japan - WBA. Referee: Armando Garcia. Scorecards: 115-113, 116-113, 116-114. Dominating the fight with studied aggression, Todaka (115) was good value for his points win over the previously unbeaten, hard-hitting Nago (115), a southpaw who was expected to pose a real danger. There were no knockdowns, but Todaka’s constant pressure was too much for the challenger, who was forced to retreat for most of the time, and apart from three sessions where he had some success with overarm rights he was generally outmanoeuvred.

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