Difference between revisions of "Marquess of Queensberry Rules"

From Barry Hugman's History of Championship Boxing
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
'''John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry''' (20 July 1844 - 31 January 1900) was a Scottish nobleman, remembered for lending his name and patronage to the Marquess of Queensberry rules that formed the basis of modern boxing. Formulated by John Graham Chambers, the rules were first introduced in 1867 when the Queensberry Challenge Cups were competed for by amateur lightweights (130lbs), Middleweights (158lbs) and heavyweights (wearing gloves) at the Lillie Bridge Grounds, Brompton Road, London. As professional boxing with gloves took off in the 1870s the new set of rules gradually replaced the London Prize Ring Rules that had governed bare-knuckle fighting.
+
'''John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry''' (20 July 1844 - 31 January 1900) was a Scottish nobleman, remembered for lending his name and patronage to the Marquess of Queensberry rules that formed the basis of modern boxing. Formulated by John Graham Chambers, the rules were first introduced in 1867 when the Queensberry Challenge Cups were competed for by amateur lightweights (130lbs), Middleweights (158lbs) and heavyweights (wearing gloves) at the Lillie Bridge Grounds, Brompton Road, London. As professional boxing with gloves took off in the 1870s the Queensberry Rules gradually replaced the London Prize Ring Rules that had governed bare-knuckle fighting.

Revision as of 21:42, 10 December 2011

John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry (20 July 1844 - 31 January 1900) was a Scottish nobleman, remembered for lending his name and patronage to the Marquess of Queensberry rules that formed the basis of modern boxing. Formulated by John Graham Chambers, the rules were first introduced in 1867 when the Queensberry Challenge Cups were competed for by amateur lightweights (130lbs), Middleweights (158lbs) and heavyweights (wearing gloves) at the Lillie Bridge Grounds, Brompton Road, London. As professional boxing with gloves took off in the 1870s the Queensberry Rules gradually replaced the London Prize Ring Rules that had governed bare-knuckle fighting.