Eddie Mustafa Muhammad

From BoxRec
Jump to: navigation, search
Eddie Mustafa Muhammad

Name: Eddie Mustafa Muhammad
Alias: Flame
Birth Name: Edward Lee Gregory
Born: 1952-04-30
Birthplace: Brooklyn, New York, USA
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York, USA
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 6′ 0″   /   183cm
Reach: 73″   /   185cm
Boxing Record: click

Managers: Jack Singer, Joe Scorcia, Gil Clancy, Ben Muhammad
Trainers: Chickie Ferrera, Jim (Slim) Robinson, Archie Moore, Al Braverman

Eddie Mustafa Muhammad became a Muslim in the early 1970s and changed his name from Eddie Gregory after he won the WBA light heavyweight title in 1980.

Amateur Career

Trained by Al Fischetti at the Police Athletic League Howard Houses in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, New York.

  • 1971 New York Golden Gloves Welterweight Champion, defeating Vito Antuofermo on points in the final.
  • 1972 New York Golden Gloves Welterweight Champion, defeating Patrick Maloney on points in the final.
  • 1972 U.S. Olympic welterweight alternate.
    Results from the U.S. Olympic Trials in Fort Worth, Texas:
    • Quarterfinal: Defeated Lamar Jackson on points.
    • Semifinal: Defeated Clint Jackson on points.
    • Final: Lost to Jesse Valdez on points.

Professional Career

  • Nicknamed "Flame" by his first manager, Jack Singer, who owned a restaurant called The Flame. Singer told Muhammad, "Your hands are fast and that's the way we cook the steaks, so we’ll call you Flame."
  • Fought Victor Galindez for the WBA light heavyweight title on November 20, 1977, and lost by a close 15-round unanimous decision.
  • Defeated Marvin Johnson by an 11th-round TKO to win the WBA light heavyweight title on March 31, 1980.
  • Scheduled to meet WBC light heavyweight champion Matthew Saad Muhammad, whom he defeated in 1977 by a 10-round split decision, in a unification fight at Madison Square Garden on February 23, 1981, on a card billed as "This Is It." The card was also going to include Gerry Cooney vs. Ken Norton, WBA welterweight champion Thomas Hearns vs. Wilfred Benitez and WBC super bantamweight champion Wilfredo Gomez vs. Mike Ayala. The show fell apart when the promoter, Harold Smith, disappeared amid allegations that he was involved in a $21.3 million fraud against Wells Fargo National Bank. Smith, whose real name was Ross Fields, was later sentenced to ten years in prison after he was convicted of 29 counts of fraud and embezzlement.
  • Lost to heavyweight Renaldo Snipes by a 10-round split decision on May 17, 1981. Muhammad had hoped to challenge WBC heavyweight champion Larry Holmes, but he returned to the light heavyweight division after losing to Snipes.
  • Lost the WBA light heavyweight title to Michael Spinks by a 15-round unanimous decision on July 18, 1981.
  • Scheduled to fight a rematch against Michael Spinks for the undisputed light heavyweight title on July 15, 1983, but he failed to make weight. Muhammad weighed 2½ pounds over the 175-pound light heavyweight limit at the official weigh-in on the morning of the fight. He was given two hours to lose the extra weight, but he declined to do so and accused Spinks' people of fixing the scales. "I know I was 175," he said. "I know my body." The boxers agreed to go ahead with the fight, but it was downgraded to a 10-round non-title bout and purses were significantly trimmed: Spinks' purse went from $1 million to $500,000, and Muhammad's was cut from $250,000 to $100,000. However, Spinks later reconsidered. Four hours before he was to enter the ring, Spinks pulled out of the fight. "Why should I sacrifice my dignity for this man?" he said. For his refusal to at least try to lose the extra weight, representatives from the WBA and WBC said Muhammad, who was ranked No. 1 by both organizations, would be removed from the light heavyweight rankings completely.
  • Fought Slobodan Kacar for the vacant IBF light heavyweight title on December 21, 1985, and lost by a 15-round split decision.
  • Inducted into the New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame in 1999, the New York State Boxing Hall of Fame in 2013 and the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame in 2015.
  • Retired with a record of 3-3 (3 knockouts) in world title fights.
  • Retired with a record of 4-3 (1 knockout) against current and future world champions.
    • Won against Matthew Saad Muhammad, Marvin Johnson, Tyrone Booze, Ricky Parkey.
    • Lost against Victor Galindez, Michael Spinks, Slobodan Kacar.

Training Career

After retiring as a boxer, Muhammad become a trainer. He has worked with the following boxers of note:

Union Work

Muhammad founded a union for professional boxers called the Joint Association of Boxers (JAB) in 2003. It is affiliated with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.

"Every other sport is organized, now the boxers will be organized," said James P. Hoffa, Teamsters general president. "Boxers need health insurance. Boxers need pensions. Boxers need to get a fair share of the proceeds of their labor."

More than 2,000 boxers had signed up by 2008.

"This is my legacy, the union," said Muhammad. "When they can no longer fight and no longer hear the roar of the crowd, the fighters will still have their medical and health benefits."

External Links

Preceded by:
Marvin Johnson
WBA Light Heavyweight Champion
1980 Mar 31 – 1981 Jul 18
Succeeded by:
Michael Spinks