Bennie Briscoe

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World Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee

Name: Bennie Briscoe
Alias: Bad Bennie
Born: 1943-02-08
Birthplace: Augusta, Georgia, USA
Died: 2010-12-28 (Age:67)
Nationality: US American
Hometown: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 5′ 8″   /   173cm
Reach: 71″   /   180cm
Boxing Record: click

Trainers: Yancey Durham, Quenzell McCall, Joe Fariello, George Benton & George James
Managers: Pinny Schafer, Jimmy Iselin, Arnold Weiss.

Bennie Briscoe Gallery


Career Review

Bennie Briscoe was a top-rated Middleweight contender during the 1970s, unsuccessfully challenging for the World Title on three different occasions. In his first fight with Carlos Monzon in Argentina, Briscoe walked away with a draw. He said getting a draw in Argentina is getting a victory in the United States. In his rematch with Monzon for the title, Briscoe badly stunned the champion in the 9th round, but failed to score a knockout and lost by decision after 15 rounds in Buenos Aires. Monzon always respected Briscoe, and when the champion was in New York one year later for the Boxing Writers dinner, he gave Briscoe a warm greeting.

Briscoe always wore a Jewish "Star of David" on his boxing trunks. Boxing magazines and news reports in the early 1970s said he was practicing the "Jewish faith." In reality, it was because two of his managers, Jimmy Iselin and Arnold Weiss, were Jewish.

Regarded as one of the best never to win a world title, Briscoe scored wins over Charley Scott, George Benton, Vicente Rondon, Kitten Hayward, Tom Bethea, Juarez DeLima, Carlos Marks, Rafael Gutierrez, Art Hernandez (for the NABF title), Billy "Dynamite" Douglas, Tony Mundine, Eddie Mustafa Muhammad, Eugene "Cyclone" Hart, Jean Mateo and Tony Chiaverini. He also lost and drew with Emile Griffith in two fights.

Briscoe finished with 66 professional wins (53 knockouts), 24 losses, five draws and one No Contest.

  • In 1962 Briscoe won the Diamond Belt at Philadelphia.
  • Amateur record: 70-3 Source: The Ring, Sept. 1963.
  • Also see: The Ring Magazine's 100 Greatest Punchers
  • 2010 Doghouse Boxing Story on Briscoe [1] comfirmed in his last bout, after beating up Jimmy Sykes for two rounds, Briscoe told his corner he no longer wanted to hurt his opponent for the rest of the ten rounder, signaling the end of his long career.
  • The Mouthpiece: Bye-Bye Bennie article
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