Manuel Ramos

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ManuelRamos

Name: Manuel Ramos
Alias: Pulgarcito
Born: 1942-11-20
Birthplace: Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
Died: 1999-06-06 (Age:56)
Hometown: Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 6′ 4″   /   193cm
Boxing Record: click


Biography

As a youth, Manuel Ramos was not interested in boxing. He was a star soccer player in school. However, he was always getting into fights on the playing field, and friends suggested he should go into boxing; which he did.


When interviewed by the Ring Magazine following his victory over Ernie Terrell, Ramos refused to discuss his early career. His first 2-3 years as a professional are clouded in mystery.

Ramos put together an impressive winning streak which included a knockout over James J. Woody. Early in his career, Ramos was always in perfect condition. By 1968, he was rated 4th in the world by Ring Magazine and touted as the greatest heavyweight in Mexican boxing history.

Ramos earned a title shot against Joe Frazier after scoring an upset 10 round decision over former WBA World Heavyweight Champion Ernie Terrell. Ramos also decked Terrell, something Muhammad Ali had been unable to do only a year before.

Ramos went toe-to-toe with Frazier and even staggered him for a brief moment, however, Frazier came back to deck Ramos for the first time in his career and stop him in the 2nd round.

Even following his loss to Joe Frazier, Ramos was highly regarded, and a Ring Magazine story even hinted that they believed he could have won the WBA Heavyweight Elimination Tournament. However, his once promising career took a nose-dive following stunning upset losses to George Chuvalo and Chuck Wepner which ended his career as a top 10 heavyweight.

Ramos hit rock bottom when he traveled to Argentina, South America and was destroyed in one round by world rated Oscar Bonavena.


Manuel Ramos was finished as a contender by age 25, yet his name enabled him to continue to fight on for almost a decade.

Ramos was reduced to a stepping stone for title bound fighters; losing to Ron Stander and Ron Lyle to name a few.

Near the end of his boxing days, even his famous iron chin had cracked and he was knockedout by Bob Hazelton and Bernardo Mercado.

After his boxing career ended, Ramos acted in a few Mexican movies.


Ramo later developed cronic health problems which lead to his death at age 56, thus closing the book on Mexico's greatest heavyweight contender.

Source

  • Internet Movie Database.