Ralph Dupas

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DupasRalph.jpeg
World Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee

Name: Ralph Dupas
Born: 1935-10-14
Birthplace: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Died: 2008-01-25 (Age:72)
Nationality: US American
Hometown: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Height: 5′ 8″   /   173cm
Reach: 68″   /   173cm
Boxing Record: click

Manager: Whitey Esneault
Trainers: Angelo Dundee and Whitey Esneault

Obituary, written by John Reid, courtesy of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Sunday, January 27, 2008 (on-line link available by subscription only):

"Ralph Dupas, who defeated Denny Moyer in New Orleans to win the world junior middleweight championship at the Municipal Auditorium in 1963, died Friday at a nursing home in Denham Springs. He was 72.
Dupas was considered one of New Orleans' best professional fighters and was known worldwide. He finished with a 104-23-6 record and was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 2000 and the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
For the past seven years, Dupas' health had deteriorated because of brain damage from the countless blows he took. In 2000, Dupas was unable to attend the Hall of Fame ceremony in Los Angeles because of complications from his illness. His brother, Tony, now deceased, pushed for his induction by writing numerous letters to committee members.
'Ralph had been bedridden for about five years, and he could not do anything, and it just got worse and worse,' Peter Dupas, Ralph's oldest brother, said Saturday. 'He just couldn't breathe anymore.'
Ralph's boxing career began in 1950 when he was 14. In 2000, Tony said Ralph lied about his age to obtain a state boxing license because the age requirement was 18. But Ralph pursued boxing to help his family, which included six brothers and three sisters.
The Dupases grew up in a two-bedroom house on the edge of the French Quarter. Their father, Peter, was a fisherman, and he left for two weeks at a time to bring home about $30. After Ralph had his first eight-round fight, he made a down payment for a four-bedroom house for his family.
Although he competed in a violent sport, Ralph was known for his friendly ways outside the ring. He always had time to sign autographs and pose for pictures.
'He always said, "No sir, yes sir," 'said legendary trainer Angelo Dundee, who worked the corner for some of Dupas' biggest fights, before Ralph's Hall of Fame induction in 2000. 'He was one of the nicest kids I've ever worked with.'
Ralph fought for 16 years and competed in three weight classes -- lightweight, junior middleweight and welterweight. In a number of his bouts, he struck quickly with jabs and bounced on his toes to avoid getting caught with a counterpunch.
But Ralph lost to New Orleanian Joe Brown in 1958 for the world lightweight championship. The fight was held in Houston because Louisiana had a law banning interracial boxing matches.
In 1962, Ralph lost a close 15-round decision to Emile Griffith for the world welterweight championship in Las Vegas. In 1963, Ralph lost a controversial 10-round decision to eventual welterweight and middleweight champion Sugar Ray Robinson.
Ralph retired in 1966 after suffering an eighth-round knockout loss to Joe Clark in Las Vegas.
When Ralph was in his prime, I was 9 or 10 years old, but I remember a lot of people talking about him,' said Eddie Dupas, Ralph's youngest brother. 'We're real proud of what he accomplished.'"

1965 Exhibition

Dupas, 155lbs. scored a 5th round TKO over Grady Naylor, 155lbs. The main event pitted Ray Wilmore vs. Billy De Priest. The card was fought at the Biloxi Community Center, and promoted by Eddie Poe.

Also inducted into the Florida Boxing Hall of Fame


Preceded by:
Denny Moyer
WBA Light Middleweight Champion
WBC Light Middleweight Champion

1963 Apr 29 – 1963 Sep 7
Succeeded by:
Sandro Mazzinghi


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