Wladimir Klitschko vs. Alexander Povetkin

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2013-10-05 : Wladimir Klitschko 241¾ lbs beat Alexander Povetkin 225¾ lbs by UD in round 12 of 12


Notes

Official scorecards
  • Klitschko and Povetkin were originally scheduled to fight on December 13, 2008, but Povetkin withdrew due to an ankle injury. [1]
  • The two were next scheduled to meet on September 11, 2010, but the fight unraveled when Povetkin, who had been training in New Jersey, failed to attend the press conference in Germany officially announcing the fight. Povetkin's camp claimed the fighter had a sinus problem and would be unable to fly for 10 days. However, there were rumors that there was a difference of opinion within the Povetkin camp about the fight; his promoters at Sauerland Event pushed for the bout but Povetkin's management and trainer Teddy Atlas wanted to delay it, believing the fighter wasn't ready to face Klitschko. K2 Promotions, Klitschko's company, complained to the IBF about Povetkin missing the news conference because it had won the promotional rights to the fight with a purse bid of $8,313,000. With so much money on the line, K2 needed him there to promote the fight, which was to take place at the 55,000-seat Commerzbank Arena in Frankfurt. The IBF sided with Klitschko and ordered him to begin negotiating with the next available contender, Samuel Peter. [2]
  • Povetkin won the vacant WBA "regular" world heavyweight title against Ruslan Chagaev on August 27, 2011. The "regular" title became vacant after Klitschko defeated David Haye to win the WBA "super" world heavyweight title on July 2, 2011. [3]
  • Promoter Vladimir Hryunov won the right to promote the October 5, 2013, fight between Klitschko and Povetkin with a purse bid of $23,333,330, one of the largest in boxing history. Russian businessman Andrey Ryabinsky put up the money. It dwarfed bids made by K2 Promotions ($7,130,000) and Povetkin promoter Sauerland Event ($6,014,444), and it allowed Ryabinsky to dictate the location of the fight and guaranteed the fighters the biggest purses of their careers. Based on being entitled to 75 percent of the winning bid, Klitschko got $17,499,997, while Povetkin received $5,833,333 (25 percent). [4]
  • Klitschko entered as The Ring Magazine World Heavyweight Champion, and Povetkin was the No. 2 contender, one spot behind Vitali Klitschko, Wladimir's older brother. [5]
  • Odds: Klitschko -650, Povetkin +485. [6]
  • Klitschko landed 139 of 417 total punches (33%) and Povetkin connected on 59 of 283 (21%). Klitschko landed 52 of 152 power shots (34%) compared to 35 of 172 (20%) for Povetkin. [7]
  • This was Klitschko's 22nd career win in a world heavyweight title fight, tying him with Muhammad Ali for second place. He trails only Joe Louis, who won 26 championship fights. Klitschko also made his 15th consecutive title defense, which is third all-time behind Larry Holmes (20) and Joe Louis (25). [8]
  • Klitschko was pilloried by some members of the media and many boxing fans for his excessive clinching during the fight and even he admitted it wasn't his finest performance. Kubrat Pulev would pay the price for Wlad's bruised ego.
  • Dan Rafael of ESPN.com reported:
Povetkin's game plan seemed simply to rush Klitschko and try to land one big overhand right, which he stopped trying to do by the middle rounds after tasting Klitschko's power. For the first few rounds, he was trying to rough up Klitschko and did make him a bit uncomfortable, but Klitschko did what his late, great trainer Emanuel Steward had taught him to do so effectively, the same strategy Steward had taught Hall of Fame former champ Lennox Lewis: to use his size advantage to tie up his opponent and to lean on him to sap his energy. Klitschko often uses the strategy of punching and then tying up, especially early in a fight. But against Povetkin, it was Klitschko's primary weapon and it made for an ugly fight.
Referee Luis Pabon, who received heavy criticism for the way he handled Povetkin's fight last year with Marco Huck, allowed Klitschko to drape himself all over Povetkin after almost every punch. No warnings or point deductions for repeated infractions that made the fight almost unwatchable.
The exciting moments came in the second and seventh rounds. In the second, Klitschko landed a fantastic left hook that dropped Povetkin for the first time in his life. In the seventh round, Klitschko nearly ended the fight with three more knockdowns. He used left hooks and right hands and took Povetkin's legs away from him, but Povetkin managed to survive the round on heart alone. As ugly as the fight was, it wasn't all Klitschko's fault. There were many times when Povetkin, even when Klitschko was leaning on him, had his hands free and didn't punch. That's on him, not Klitschko. If Pabon wasn't going to warn Klitschko for the constant learning and clinching, why would he stop doing what was so effective?
Klitschko bruised Povetkin's right eye in the middle of the fight, cut his left eye late and was so obviously winning big that when Pabon finally took a point from Klitschko in the 11th round for shoving a weary Povetkin to the canvas, it meant nothing. The outcome was obvious: another easy Klitschko win against an overmatched opponent. [9]

Post-Fight Quotes

  • "That was a tough bit of work, he's a real fighter. I kept landing the punches, but he stayed in there. I believe it was a deserved win, but I think I can improve still." - Klitschko
  • "Things didn't quite go as well as I wanted, but I never give up. Of course, he was the better fighter, he's the best in the world, that's clear." - Povetkin [10]


Preceded by:
Povetkin vs. Wawrzyk
WBA Heavyweight Title Fight
# 104
Succeeded by:
Current
Preceded by:
Klitschko vs. Pianeta
IBF Heavyweight Title Fight
# 60
Succeeded by:
Current
Preceded by:
Klitschko vs. Pianeta
IBO Heavyweight Title Fight
# 36
Succeeded by:
Current
Preceded by:
Klitschko vs. Pianeta
WBO Heavyweight Title Fight
# 48
Succeeded by:
Current