Difference between revisions of "Muhammad Ali"

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*Six-time Kentucky State [[Golden Gloves]] Champion
 
*Six-time Kentucky State [[Golden Gloves]] Champion
 
'''1955'''<br>
 
'''1955'''<br>
*James Davis L 3.
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*James Davis L 3  
 
*John Hampton W 3
 
*John Hampton W 3
 
*John Hampton L 3
 
*John Hampton L 3
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*Donnie Hall W 3
 
*Donnie Hall W 3
 
*[[Jimmy Ellis]] W 3
 
*[[Jimmy Ellis]] W 3
*Terry Hodge LRSCI 1  
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*Terry Hodge RSCI by 1  
 
*Donnie Hall W 3
 
*Donnie Hall W 3
 
*[[Jimmy Ellis]] L 3
 
*[[Jimmy Ellis]] L 3
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**Allen Hudson KO 3
 
**Allen Hudson KO 3
 
*[[Olympics|Olympic]] Light Heavyweight Gold Medalist in Rome, Italy. Results:
 
*[[Olympics|Olympic]] Light Heavyweight Gold Medalist in Rome, Italy. Results:
**[[Yvon Becaus]] (Belgium) TKO 2
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**[[Yvon Becaus]] (Belgium) RSC 2
**[[Gennadi Schatkov]] (USSR) W 3
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**[[Gennadi Schatkov]] (USSR) W 3 (5-0)
**[[Tony Madigan]] (Australia) W 3
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**[[Tony Madigan]] (Australia) W 3 (5-0)
**[[Zbigniew Pietrzykowski]] (Poland) W 3
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**[[Zbigniew Pietrzykowski]] (Poland) W 3 (5-0)
  
 
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  before= [[Jim Boyd]] |
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  title= [[Olympic Games Medalists| Olympic Gold Medalist]] <br /> Light Heavyweight Champion |
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  years= 1960 |
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  after= [[Cosimo Pinto]]
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{{succession box | title=[[United States Amateur Light Heavyweight Champions|National AAU]]                     <br/> Light Heavyweight Champion | before=[[Sylvester Banks]]| after= [[Bob Christopherson]]| years=1959-1960}}
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   years= 1960 |
 
   years= 1960 |
 
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  before= [[Jim Boyd]] |
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  title= [[Olympic Games Medalists| Olympic Gold Medalist]] <br /> Light Heavyweight Champion |
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  after= [[Cosimo Pinto]]
 
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Revision as of 06:25, 7 May 2013

Ali 1966.jpg
Class of 1990
Modern Category
Hall of Fame bio:click
World Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee

Name: Muhammad Ali
Alias: The Greatest
Birth Name: Cassius Marcellus Clay
Born: 1942-01-17
Birthplace: Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 6′ 3″   /   191cm
Reach: 78″   /   198cm
Boxing Record: click

Trainer: Angelo Dundee
Manager: Herbert Muhammad
Muhammad Ali Gallery

Amateur Achievements

The 1960 Rome Olympics
  • There have been various amateur records accredited to Muhammad Ali. 100-5, 127-5, 134-7, 137-7, and 99-8 are among the claims.
  • Six-time Kentucky State Golden Gloves Champion

1955

  • James Davis L 3
  • John Hampton W 3
  • John Hampton L 3

1957

  • Donnie Hall W 3
  • Donnie Hall L 3
  • Donnie Hall W 3
  • Jimmy Ellis W 3
  • Terry Hodge RSCI by 1
  • Donnie Hall W 3
  • Jimmy Ellis L 3
  • Donnie Hall W 3

1958

  • Chicago Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions Light Heavyweight Quarterfinalist. Results:
    • Alex Watt W 3
    • Francis Turley W 3
    • Kent Green KO by 2

1959

  • Chicago Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions Light Heavyweight Champion. Results:
    • Junie Hall KO 2
    • Willie McMilan W 3
    • Cliff Murkey W 3
    • Jeff Davis W 3
  • Intercity Golden Gloves Light Heavyweight Champion, outpointing Tony Madigan.
  • National AAU Light Heavyweight Champion. Results:
    • Reginald Brown KO 3
    • Art Toombs W 3
    • Lindy Lindmoser W 3
    • Johnny Powell W 3
  • U.S. Pan American Games Trials Finalist. Results:

1960


Preceded by:
Sylvester Banks
National AAU
Light Heavyweight Champion

1959-1960
Succeeded by:
Bob Christopherson
Preceded by:
Kent Green
Chicago Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions
Light Heavyweight Champion

1959
Succeeded by:
Jeff Davis
Preceded by:
James Hargett
Intercity Golden Gloves
Light Heavyweight Champion

1959
Succeeded by:
Jeff Davis
Preceded by:
Jimmy Jones
Chicago Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions
Heavyweight Champion

1960
Succeeded by:
Al Jenkins
Preceded by:
Sylvester Banks
Intercity Golden Gloves
Heavyweight Champion

1960
Succeeded by:
Ray Patterson
Preceded by:
Jim Boyd
Olympic Gold Medalist
Light Heavyweight Champion

1960
Succeeded by:
Cosimo Pinto


Professional Achievements

  • The first and only three-time lineal World Heavyweight Champion.
  • The first World Heavyweight Champion to come back from retirement and regain the title.
  • Won twenty-two World Heavyweight Championship fights. Ali made a total of nineteen successful title defenses, nine during his first reign and ten during his second reign.

Acting Career

  • Appeared in a number of movies and television shows. IMDb credits: [1]

Awards and Recognition

Factoids

  • Muhammad Ali is the brother of fellow boxer Rahman Ali, the father of female world champion Laila Ali, and the uncle of Ibn Ali.
  • When Ali was 12 years old, he and a friend went to the Columbia Auditorium to partake in the free hot dogs and popcorn available for visitors of the Louisville Home Show. When the boys were done eating, they went back to get their bicycles only to discover that Ali's had been stolen. Furious, Ali went to the basement of the Columbia Auditorium to report the crime to police officer Joe Martin, who was also a boxing coach at the Columbia Gym. When Ali said he wanted to beat up the person who stole his bike, Martin told him that he should probably learn to fight first. A few days later, Ali began boxing training at Martin's gym.
  • Ali also trained with Fred Stoner, an African-American trainer working at the Grace Community Center in Louisville. After he became World Heavyweight Champion, Ali said Stoner "taught me all I know."
  • Ali graduated from Central High School in Louisville with a D- average, ranking 376 in a class of 391.
  • Ali was afraid of flying after he had a rough flight going to California for the Olympic trials, so before he flew to Rome for the Olympics, he visited an army surplus store and purchased a parachute, which he wore throughout the flight to Rome.
  • After returning to Louisville as the Olympic light heavyweight champion, Ali was refused service at a "whites only" restaurant. He was so disgusted that he threw his gold medal into the Ohio River.
  • Shortly after winning the World Heavyweight Championship, Ali announced that he was a member of the Nation of Islam and changed his name from Cassius Marcellus Clay to Muhammad Ali. He was given the name by Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad. In Arabic, Muhammad means "worthy of all praises" and Ali means "most high."
  • Ali's first fight with Joe Frazier indirectly led to four deaths:
    • Two spectators at Madison Square Garden died of heart attacks during the fight.
    • Erio Borghisiani was found dead in front of his television just hours after viewing the fight on paid television in Milan, Italy.
    • In Malaysia, Abdul Ghani Bachik was reported to have leaped up from his chair while watching the fight on paid television and shouted, "My God, Cassius Clay has fallen!" He then suffered a fatal heart attack.
  • Two fighters retired after being knocked out by Ali: Donnie Fleeman and LaMar Clark.
  • Both Archie Moore and George Chuvalo suffered the last losses of their career to Ali.

Historical Rankings

  • A World Boxing readers poll ranked Ali as the 5th greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1974.
  • The Ring ranked Ali as the 9th greatest heavyweight of all-time in the March 1975 issue.
  • John Durant, author of The Heavyweight Champions, ranked Ali as the 4th greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1976.
  • Bill Brennan, former WBA president, ranked Ali as the greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1978.
  • Nigel Collins, former editor-in-chief of The Ring, ranked Ali as the greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1997.
  • Herbert Goldman, former editor-in-chief of Boxing Illustrated, ranked Ali as the greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1997.
  • Steve Farhood, Showtime commentator and former editor-in-chief of The Ring, ranked Ali as the greatest heavyweight of all-time in 1997.
  • The Ring ranked Ali as the greatest heavyweight of all-time in the 1998 Holiday issue.
  • A five-member panel for the Associated Press ranked Ali as the best heavyweight and second best pound-for-pound fighter of the 20th century in 1999.
  • ESPN ranked Ali as the second greatest boxer of all-time in 2007.

Reference Sources



Preceded by:
Sonny Liston
WBA Heavyweight Champion
1964 Feb 25 – 1964 Sep 14
Stripped
Succeeded by:
Ernie Terrell
Preceded by:
Sonny Liston
WBC Heavyweight Champion
1964 Feb 25 – 1970 Feb 3
Retired
Succeeded by:
Joe Frazier
Preceded by:
Sonny Liston
NYSAC World Heavyweight Champion
1964 Feb 25 – 1967 May 9
Stripped
Succeeded by:
Joe Frazier
Preceded by:
Ernie Terrell
WBA Heavyweight Champion
1967 Feb 6 – 1967 May 9
Stripped
Succeeded by:
Jimmy Ellis
Preceded by:
George Foreman
WBA Heavyweight Champion
WBC Heavyweight Champion

1974 Oct 30 – 1978 Feb 15
Succeeded by:
Leon Spinks
Preceded by:
Leon Spinks
WBA Heavyweight Champion
1978 Sep 15 – 1979 Sep 6
Retired
Succeeded by:
John Tate