Sugar Ray Robinson

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Class of 1990
Modern Category
Hall of Fame bio:click
World Boxing Hall of Fame Inductee

Name: Sugar Ray Robinson
Birth Name: Walker Smith Jr.
Born: 1921-05-03
Birthplace: Ailey, Georgia, USA
Died: 1989-04-12 (Age:67)
Hometown: Harlem, New York, USA
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 5′ 11″   /   180cm
Reach: 72½″   /   184cm
Boxing Record: click

Managers: Curt Horrmann & George Gainford
Trainers: Soldier Jones, Harry Wiley & Pee Wee Beale
Sugar Ray Robinson Gallery

Sugar Ray Robinson is considered by many boxing historians and enthusiasts to be the greatest pound-for-pound boxer of all-time. Robinson is frequently, if not always, ranked among the top three boxers ever in both the welterweight and middleweight classes.

Amateur Achievements

  • Amateur Record: Usually listed as 85-0 with 69 KOs (40 in the first round) but Robinson lost to Billy Graham and Patsy Pesca under his given name, Walker Smith Jr.
  • Won the 1938 New York Metropolitan AAU Open Championship at bantamweight vs. Ed Cappelli.


Preceded by:
Tony Saraullo
New York Daily News Golden Gloves
Open Featherweight Champion

1939
Succeeded by:
Louis Valentine
Preceded by:
Tony Saraullo
New York Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions
Featherweight Champion

1939
Succeeded by:
Frankie Donato
Preceded by:
Eddie Dempsey
Intercity Golden Gloves
Featherweight Champion

1939
Succeeded by:
Frankie Donato
Preceded by:
Willie Smith
New York Daily News Golden Gloves
Open Lightweight Champion

1940
Succeeded by:
Willie Smith
Preceded by:
Johnny Pleasant
New York Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions
Lightweight Champion

1940
Succeeded by:
Johnny Green
Preceded by:
Johnny Pleasant
Intercity Golden Gloves
Lightweight Champion

1940
Succeeded by:
Johnny Green



Awards & Recognition

Miscellaneous

  • Robinson beat sixteen former, reigning, or future world champions during his professional career.
  • According to Robinson's autobiography, sportswriter Jack Case, after seeing one of Robinson’s amateur performances, said he “sure was a sweet fighter.” Chase called him “Sugar Ray” in one of his sports columns and the now famous moniker was born.
  • Robinson was a coach for the 1941 New York Golden Gloves Team at the Intercity Golden Gloves Tournament held in Chicago.
  • Robinson won his first 40 professional fights before losing to Jake LaMotta.
  • Height dispute: Robinson's height is usually listed as 5'11", but he was often listed as 6'0" early in his career. He was reported as being 5'11½" at the weigh-in for his bout with Robert Villemain in 1950.
  • Served in the United States Army, boxing exhibitions in the United States for American soldiers.
  • Once owned an entire block of shops and businesses in Harlem.
  • Robinson retired in 1952 with a record of 131-3-2. He returned to the ring in 1955 and retired for good in 1965.
  • When his boxing career ended, Robinson became an actor. He appeared in such films as The Detective (starring Frank Sinatra) and Candy (starring Marlon Brando). He also appeared on the television shows Mission: Impossible, The Mod Squad, and Fantasy Island.
  • Suffered from Alzheimer's disease and diabetes in his later years.
  • View: Sugar Ray Robinson's Exhibition Bouts

Sources:

Death Info

Ray Robinson is listed as SUGAR RAY ROBINSON in both the Social Security Death Records database and the California Death Records database on the RootsWeb website. His Social Security number was 080-28-1189. According to the California Death Records, he was born in Michigan on May 3, 1921. Both his autobiography and Social Security Records list the same birthdate. The index is wrong as to his place of birth, as he was actually born in Ailey, Georgia. When he was an infant, his family moved to Glenwood, Georgia.

External Link



Preceded by:
Marty Servo
Vacated
World Welterweight Champion
1946 Dec 20 – 1951 Feb 14
Vacated
Succeeded by:
Johnny Bratton
Recognized by NBA
Preceded by:
Jake LaMotta
World Middleweight Champion
1951 Feb 14 – 1951 Jul 10
Succeeded by:
Randy Turpin
Preceded by:
Randy Turpin
World Middleweight Champion
1951 Sep 12 – 1952 Dec
Retired
Succeeded by:
Carl (Bobo) Olson
Preceded by:
Carl (Bobo) Olson
World Middleweight Champion
1955 Dec 9 – 1957 Jan 2
Succeeded by:
Gene Fullmer
Preceded by:
Gene Fullmer
World Middleweight Champion
1957 May 1 – 1957 Sep 23
Succeeded by:
Carmen Basilio
Preceded by:
Carmen Basilio
World Middleweight Champion
1958 Mar 25 – 1960 Jan 22
Robinson was recognized only by New York and Massachusetts when he lost the title. He had been stripped by the NBA due to inactivity.
Succeeded by:
Paul Pender