User:Drdatabox

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This is the nickname of Julian E. Compton. He is a professor of modern culture. However the nickname comes from his interest, research and synthesizing of data in the sport of professional boxing. In 1967 he began counting blows in live, TV, and filmed bouts. In 1976 he contributed the article, "Towards a Boxscore for Boxing", which sought to expand the categories of boxing data beyond wins and KOs, knockdowns and cuts. Those new categories were incorporated into the statistical game Data Boxing, which was marketed from 1976-82. The game was popular with boxing writers, due to it's obvious awareness of information below the headlines of boxing history, and it's mathematical structure, which allowed for the matchup of boxing greats from different time periods. After 1982, the game was produced as a bootleg edition with no updates. However diehard fans kept the game going for over twenty years, by making their own boxing ratings on boxers such as "Sugar" Ray Leonard and Evander Holyfield. Though the game was not produced, Compton continued his research, and produced even more complex versions of the game structure. In 2004 the game reappeared as a computer version, with the help of Cape Canaveral programmer, Don Mankowski. Further revisions are underway, and with the help of Jeff Downey of Downey Games, Data Boxing has appeared in a computer version, and will appear in a table game version. Compton has made recent appeals for volunteers to join in the collection of data, particularly counting blows, and all other events(moves in, circles, retreats, clinches, etc.) and to contribute them to boxrec.com, so that all of boxing history can be found in one reliable, universal location. Compton is a member of IBRO, and the current Data Boxing number one All- Time Rankings, agree with IBRO's number ones in six of the eight historical divisions. See also Data Boxing and Events. Those interested in contributing to boxing history, by doing the hard work of counting blows and controls, are urged to contact him at Drdatabox@aol.com