Weight divisions

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Current Weight Divisions

Heavyweight Primo Carnera & Flyweight Frankie Genaro

The currently-recognized weight divisions/classes (17 in all) for professional male boxers, listed in maximum allowable kilograms/pounds, as defined by the four major sanctioning bodies, are:

Weight Class
Limit in Stone kg Pounds
Mini Flyweight (IBF/WBO)
Strawweight (WBC)
Minimumweight (WBA)
7½ st 47,627 kg 105 lbs
Junior Flyweight (WBO/IBF)
Light Flyweight (WBA/WBC)
7st 10 lbs 48,988 kg 108 lbs
Flyweight 8 st 50,802 kg 112 lbs
Super Flyweight (WBA/WBC)
Junior Bantamweight (WBO/IBF)
8 st 3 lbs 52,163 kg 115 lbs
Bantamweight 8 st 6 lbs 53,525 kg 118 lbs
Super Bantamweight (WBA/WBC)
Junior Featherweight (WBO/IBF)
8 st 10 lbs 55,225 kg 122 lbs
Featherweight 9 st 57,153 kg 126 lbs
Super Featherweight (WBA/WBC)
Junior Lightweight (WBO/IBF)
9 st 4 lbs 58,967 kg 130 lbs
Lightweight 9 st 9 lbs 61,235 kg 135 lbs
Super Lightweight (WBA/WBC)
Junior Welterweight (WBO/IBF)
10 st 63,503 kg 140 lbs
Welterweight 10½ st 66,678 kg 147 lbs
Super Welterweight (WBA/WBC)
Junior Middleweight (WBO/IBF)
11 st 69,85 kg 154 lbs
Middleweight 11 st 6 lbs 72,574 kg 160 lbs
Super Middleweight 12 st 76,203 kg 168 lbs
Light Heavyweight 12½ st 79,378 kg 175 lbs
Cruiserweight (WBA/WBC/IBF)
Junior Heavyweight (WBO)
14 st 4 lbs 90,892 kg 200 lbs
Heavyweight > 14 st 4 lbs > 90,892 kg > 200 lbs

Professional Women's Weight Divisions

  • Pinweight: up to 101 pounds
  • Light Flyweight: 106
  • Flyweight: 110
  • Light Bantamweight: 114
  • Bantamweight: 119
  • Featherweight: 125
  • Lightweight: 132
  • Light Welterweight: 138
  • Welterweight: 145
  • Light Middleweight: 154
  • Middleweight: 165
  • Light Heavyweight: 176
  • Heavyweight: over 189

Amateur Weight Divisions

  • Light Flyweight: up to 106 pounds
  • Flyweight: 112
  • Bantamweight: 119
  • Featherweight: 125
  • Lightweight: 132
  • Light Welterweight: 141
  • Welterweight: 152
  • Middleweight: 165
  • Light Heavyweight: 178
  • Heavyweight: 201
  • Super Heavyweight: over 201

Traditional Eight Divisions

These are commonly known today as the "traditional divisions," which were basically the only weight classes throughout the early 20th Century, before the numerous "super," "junior" and "light" classes were added.

  • Flyweight: 8 st (50,802 Kg / 112 lbs)
  • Bantamweight: 8 st 6 lbs (53,525 kg / 118 lbs)
  • Featherweight: 9 st (57,153 kg / 126 lbs)
  • Lightweight: 9 st 9 lbs (61,235 kg / 135 lbs)
  • Welterweight: 10½ st (66,678 kg / 147 lbs)
  • Middleweight: 11 st 6 lbs (72,574 kg / 160 lbs)
  • Light Heavyweight: 12½ st (79,378 kg / 175 lbs)
  • Heavyweight: (unlimited)

History of the Weight Divisions

The 21 National Sporting Club (NSC) Rules- (1891-?) London-based private club amends 12 Queensberry Rules, modifying with new augment rules with nine specific criteria, such as designating role of officials; devised a system of scoring bouts; and enabled referee to determine who won. Major accomplishment transpired in 1909 ratification vote and 1910 implementation of 8 traditional weight classes:

  • Heavyweight [176 lbs plus; at least 75.3 kg; over 12 stone, 7 lbs]
  • Cruiserweight [175 lb maximum; 79.5 kg; or 12 stone, 7 pounds] later called "lighter heavyweight" by the English and "light heavyweight" by the Americans. Solidified under the New York State Athletic Commission and National Boxing Association as one division, with a uniform name.
  • Middleweight [160 lbs maximum; 72.7 kg; or 11 stone, 4 pounds]
  • Welterweight [147 lbs maximum; 66.8 kg; or 10 stone, 7 pounds]
  • Lightweight [135lbs maximum; 61.4 kg; or 9 stone, 9 pounds]
  • Featherweight [126lbs maximum; 57.3 kg; or 9 stone]
  • Bantamweight [118lbs maximum; 53.6 kg; or 8 stone, 6 pounds]
  • Flyweight [112lbs maximum; 50.9 kg; or 8 stone]

NOTE: weight class key- one pound equals .45359237 kilograms one pound equals .0714285714 stone- sixteen ounces equals one pound, 14 stone and 6 kilograms.

Olympic Boxing Classes & Weight Divisions: [American lbs, European kilograms, English stones]

  • One pound (lb as unit of mass) is equal to 16 ounces (oz)
  • One kilogram (also equal to 1,000 grams) is equal to 2.2 lbs
  • One stone is equal to 14 pounds (with pounds rounding 5/8th)
  • Super Heavyweight: [202lbs + above; 91.6 kg or 14 stone, 6 pounds] – (est. 1984-end 2004): legislation pending before International Olympic Congress, not subject to change by AIBA.
  • Heavyweight: [179-201lbs*; 81.2 – 91.2 kg; 12 stone, 11 pounds – 14 stone, 5 pounds]– (est. 1904)
  • Light Heavyweight: [166-178lbs; 75.3 – 80.7 kg; or 11 stone, 12 pounds – 12 stone, 10 pounds – (est. 1920)
  • Middleweight: [157-165lbs; 71.2 – 74.8; or 11 stone, 3 pounds – 11 stone, 11 pounds] – (est. 1904)
  • Light Middleweight: [148-156lbs; 67.1 – 70.8 kg; or 10 stone, 8 pounds – 11 stone, 2 pound] – (est. 1952)
  • Welterweight: [140-147lbs; 63.5 – 66.7 kg; or 10 stone – 10 stone, 7 pounds] – (est. 1904)
  • Light Welterweight: [133-139lbs; 60.3 – 63.0 kg; or 9 stone, 7 pounds – 9 stone, 13 pounds] – (est. 1952)
  • Lightweight: [126-132lbs; 57.2 – 59.9 kg; or 9 stone – 9 stone, 6 pounds] – (est. 1904)
  • Featherweight: [120-125lbs; 54.4 – 56.7 kg; or 8 stone, 8 pounds – 8 stone, 13 pounds] – (est. 1904)
  • Bantamweight: [113-119lbs; 51.3 – 53.9 kg; or 8 stone, 1 pound – 8 stone, 7 pounds] – (est. 1904)
  • Flyweight: [107-112lbs; 48.5 – 50.8 kg; or 7 stone, 9 pounds – 8 stone] – (est. 1904)
  • Light Flyweight: [106 – below; less than 48.1 kg; or 7 stone, 8 pounds and below] – (est. 1968)

Weight Class Divisions: 17 [American lbs, European kilograms, English stones]

  • Heavyweight (over 200 pounds-unlimited; over 91.4 kg; 14 stone, 5 pounds - unlimited)- first originated as 160 pounds plus (over 72.7 kg or 11 stone, 4 pounds) by Jack Broughton (in 1738); next established by theABA as unlimited (in 1889); reaffirmed no limit by the NSC (in 1909); changed by the NYSAC to 175 plus in 1920; modified again in 1979 by the WBC (followed by the WBA in 1982 and the IBF in 1983); again modified in 2004 by the WBA, WBC and IBF to mean 201-plus pounds.
  • Cruiserweight [also called junior heavyweight- (176-200 lbs; 80.0 – 90.0 kg; 12 stone 8 pounds – 14 stone 4 pounds)- first originated in England (later called lighter-heavyweight); next established as 176-190 lbs (80.0 – 86.2 kg or 12 stone, 8 pounds – 13 stone, 8 pounds) by the WBC in 1979, then the WBA in 1982, and the IBF in 1983; modified in 2004 first by the WBC, then the WBA and next by the IBF to allow a maximum limit of 200 pounds. NOTE: the English class Cruiserweights (from 1889-1937) became Light heavyweight (1937-present). The name reappeared in America (in 1980) for a new class of 190, then 195 and now 200 pound boxers.
  • Light Heavyweight [also called lighter-heavyweight] (169-175 lbs; 76.8 – 79.5 kg; 12 stone, 1 pounds – 12 stones, 7 pounds)- initially created by Lou Houseman for his fighter Jack Root (in 1903); first established by the NSC (in 1909) as 12 stone, 7 pounds or 175 lbs.
  • Super Middleweight [also called Junior Light Heavyweight] (161-168 lbs; 73.2 – 76.4 kg; 11 stone, 7 pounds – 12 stones)- first established in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1967 (see Don Fullmer vs. Joe Hopkins); then re-established by the Ohio Boxing Commission (in 1974); then "resurrected" by the World Athletic Association (in 1982); next recognized by the IBF (in 1984); then the WBA (in 1987): and last by the WBC (in 1988).
  • Middleweight (155-160 lbs; 70.5 – 72.7 kg; 11 stone, 1 pound – 11 stone, 6 pounds)- first established by the ABA as 11 stone, 4 pounds (in 1889); modified by the NSC (in 1909) as 11 stone, 6 pounds or 160 lbs.
  • Junior Middleweight [also called Light Middleweight, Super Welterweight] (148-154 lbs; 67.3 – 70.0 kg; 10 stone, 8 pounds – 11 stone)- first created by the New York Walker Law (in 1920); first established by the NBA (in 1956). Universally accepted by the Austrian Boxing Council and European Boxing Union (in 1962). NOTE: this weight class can be divided into two historical periods: 1956-1962 and 1963-present.
  • Welterweight (141-147 lbs; 64.1 – 66.8 kg; 10 stone, 1 pound – 10 stone, 7 pounds)- first recognized in England as 142-145 pounds (in 1889, then 1892). Next established by the NSC (in 1909) as 10 stone, 7 pounds or 147 lbs and made uniform as 147 pounds by the NYSAC and NBA (in 1920).
  • Junior Welterweight also called Light Welterweight, Super Lightweight (136-140 lbs; 61.8 – 63.6 kg; 9 stone, 10 pounds – 10 stone)- first created by the New York Walker Law (in 1920). First recognized by Boxing Blade and also sanctioned by the NBA (in 1922); first established by the WBC in 1968. NOTE: This weight class can be divided into three distinct historical periods: 1922-1935, 1946 and 1959-present
  • Lightweight (131-135 lbs; 59.5 – 61.4 kg; 9 stone, 5 pounds – 9 stone, 9 pounds) – first originated as any fighter whose weight was less than 160 pounds by Jack Broughton (in 1738); under London Prize Ring, weight class ranged from (130-150); next established by the ABA as 10 stone (in 1889); modified by the NSC (in 1909) as 9 stone, 9 pounds or 135 lbs. First English Champion John Moneghan (in 1850).
  • Junior Lightweight [also called Super Featherweight] (127-130 lbs; 57.7 – 59.1 kg; or 9 stone, 1 pound – 9 stone, 4 pounds)- created by the New York Walker Law (in 1920), though first established by the NYSAC (in 1930). NOTE: this weight class can be divided into distinct historical periods: 1921-1933 and 1959-present.
  • Featherweight (123-126 lbs; 55.9 – 57.3 kg: or 8 stone, 11 pounds – 9 stone) – first created under London Prize Ring Rules (in 1860) as 118 lbs (53.6 kg or 8 stone, 6 pounds); first established by the ABA as 126 lbs (57.3 kg or 9 stone in 1889); changed under Marquess Rules to 110 lbs (in 1889); next changed to 115 pounds (52.3 kg or 8 stone, 3 pounds) when George Dixon beat Cal McCarthy in 1890; his manager then changed to 120 lbs (54.4 kg or 8 stone, 8 pounds) when Dixon beat Abe Willis; modified by the NSC (in 1909) as 126 lbs (57.3 kg or 9 stone).
  • Junior Featherweight [also called Light Featherweight, Super Bantamweight] (119-122 lbs; 54.1 – 55;5 kg; or 8 stone, 7 pounds – 8 stone, 10 pounds)- first created by the New York Walker Law, though not fully established by the NYSAC (in 1920); first sanctioned by the WBC (in 1976).
  • Bantamweight (116-118 lbs; 52.7 – 53.6 kg; or 8 stone, 4 pound – 8 stone, 6 pounds)- first established by the ABA (in 189), then fully sanctioned by the NSC (in 1909) as 118 lbs (53.6 kg or 8 stone, 6 pounds). Later solidified by the New York Walker Law for standardized weight divisions (in 1920); endorsed by the NYSAC, and sanctioned by the NBA. Under London Prize Ring Rules, the weight division was 105 lbs (47.7 kg or 7 stone, 7 pounds). Under Queensberry Rules, it increased to 112 lbs (50.9 kg or 8 stone in 1880) and then 115 pounds (52.3 kg or 8 stone, 3 pounds in 1890). The weight class was set at 116 pounds (52.7 kg or 8 stone, 4 pounds in 1898). The present 118 pound limit was first adopted in England (in 1904), then by the NSC (in 1909).
  • Junior Bantamweight [also called Light Bantamweight, Super Flyweight] (113-115 lbs; 51.4 – 52.3 kg; or 8 stone, 1 pound – 8 stone, 3 pounds)- first created by the New York Walker Law (in 1920) regulating standardized weight divisions.
  • Flyweight [also called Paperweight in England] (109-112 lbs; 49.5 – 50.0 kg; or 7 stone, 11 pounds – 8 stone)- first established by the NSC (in 1909) as 112 lbs (50.9 kg or 8 stone). English boxing authorities followed suit and set the weight limit as 108 lbs (49.1 kg or 7 stone, 10 pounds in 1910). United States boxing commissions NBA and NYSAC recognized this weight class (in 1927). New York’s Walker Law next established the weight class (in 1920) as 112 pounds.
  • Junior Flyweight [also called Light Flyweight] (106-108 lbs; 48.2 – 49.1 kg; 7 stone, 8 pounds – 7 stone, 10 pounds)- first established by the New York Walker Law (in 1920) regulating standardized weight divisions, though not first sanctioned by the WBC (in 1975).
  • Strawweight [also called Minimumweight, Mini-Flyweight] (96-105 lbs; 43.6 – 47.7 kg; or 6 stone, 12 pounds – 7 stone, 7 pounds)- first established by the IBF (in 1987) and later recognized by both the WBA and WBC (in 1988).
  • Paperweight (95lbs-below; less than 43.2 kg; or 6 stone, 11 pounds)- first established by the Queensberry Amateur Championship and ABA as 95 lbs and less (in 1880). In time the paperweight champion became synonymous with the flyweight and bantamweight champions, although the weight actually increased 17 pounds by sanctioning of the NSC around 1896-1898.

Weight Class History: 17 alphabetical weight classes [Cruiserweight by the World Boxing Council (in 1979); Super Middleweight (or junior light heavyweight) in Utah in 1967, by the Ohio Boxing Commission (in 1974), by the World Athletic Association in 1982, and officially by the International Boxing Federation (in 1984); and Mini-Flyweight (Strawweight or Minimumweight) by the International Boxing Federation (in 1987). NOTE: Cruiserweight limit was changed from 190-195 to a uniform 200, and was recognized by the World Boxing Council, World Boxing Association and International Boxing Federation (in 2004)].

14 conventional weight classes (Junior Middleweight, Junior Welterweight, Junior Lightweight, Junior Featherweight, Junior Bantamweight and Junior Flyweight) amended by the NBA and NYSAC after implemented New York Walker Law of 1920).

8 traditional weight classes (Light Heavyweight, Welterweight and Flyweight) established by the National Sporting Club of London (ratified in 1909) as championship divisions (est. 1910).

5 professional divisions throughout the 19th century (in 1889) with Bantamweight (Flyweight later modified three times as Featherweight) as set forth by the Pelican Club (a combination entity of the Pugilistic Society and Club; later gave way to the National Sporting Club, which in time became the modern day British Board of Boxing Control).

4 original weight classes (Middleweight and Featherweight) adopted by the Amateur Boxing Association (in 1880).

2 inaugural weight classes (Heavyweight and Light(er)weight) set by Broughton’s Rules governing prize fights (in 1738).

Primary Source of this "History of the Weight Divisions" section: THE HISTORY OF MODERN DAY WEIGHT CATEGORIES (as edited by BoxRec Wikipedia Editors)--Boxing Press, Editor in Chief, Greg Goodrich


See also, World Champions By Weight Class