Gene Tunney vs. Tom Heeney

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Poster

Gene Tunney 192 lbs beat Tom Heeney 203 lbs by TKO at 2:52 in round 11 of 15

Notes

  • Tunney's purse was $525,000 and Heeney's was $100,000.
  • The cost to rent Yankee Stadium was $52,142.
  • General expenses were $35,000.
  • Total expenses were $712,142.
  • The promoter's figures showed that a total of 43,191 paid admission and 3,496 received complimentary tickets.
  • The bout grossed $691,014.50 and netted $521,422.23.
  • Movie rights were $20,000 and radio rights were $15,000.
  • Total income was $556,422.23.
  • The federal government collected $139,483.72 and the New York State Treasury received $30,108.55.
  • Tex Rickard's Madison Square Garden corporation lost $155,719.77 on the promotion of the fight. "It was all my fault," Rickard said. "I allowed myself to be talked into staging the bout in July, the worst month of the year, when a date in September, with everyone back in New York after summer holidays, would have assured a gate of at least $400,000 more."
  • Tunney was a 3 to 1 favorite.
  • Former World Heavyweight Champion Jack Dempsey shook hands with both boxers in the ring before the fight and was cheered loudly by the crowd.
  • The following is from the website of The Ring Magazine:
The opening rounds saw Heeney plowing inside and Tunney catching him with well-timed jabs and counters. The action was often messy and clinch-filled but Tunney did most of the effective scoring. By the eighth Tunney’s steady work had closed and cut Heeney’s left eye and his attack had the "Hard Rock" beating an uncharacteristic retreat. Ever game, Heeney continued to march in but Tunney’s razor-sharp skills and ring intelligence were far too much for him to handle. In the closing moments of the 10th, a double jab and a chopping right sent Heeney to the floor along the ropes. Slumped on his stool and clearly laboring for breath, Heeney nevertheless came out for the 11th. Moving in and out with educated ease, Tunney raked Heeney with short punches to the face and body. Heeney refused to fall in the face of Tunney’s fusillade so referee Eddie Forbes was forced to intervene to save Heeney from his own bravery. The well-beaten Heeney offered no argument as he exchanged pleasantries with the victorious champion, who was about to embark on a long and prosperous life outside of boxing.
  • Tunney announced his retirement from boxing five days after the fight. "There is no contender at the present time who appears capable of attracting real public interest," he said. "If there were I might delay my retirement long enough to face him in the ring, but it looks as if it might take two or three years before a dangerous opponent is developed. That is too long to stand and wait."

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